Saturday, April 09, 2016

Hubble Space Telescope

Now here's a post about something we've all heard of, the Hubble Space Telescope. Finding a subject beginning with "H" has taken me hours. I first looked at the constellation of Hydra then moved on to planets, nothing there and while looking at images of constellations I realized that the most interesting "Space" subject would be the Hubble Telescope.
Pillars of Creation source
This is an amazing piece of technology that has really changed our perception of the Universe since it's launch in 1990. The images currently being received are astounding to say the least. But that hasn't always been the case, there were some glitches in the beginning. When the Telescope first reached orbit it was found that the mirror was flawed and the images were useless. When I make a mess of things the chances of it costing billions to sort out are very remote, more like me doing a bit of overtime and hey presto, problem solved. But that wasn't the case with repairing the flaw in the Hubble Space Telescope. Driving the Space Shuttle isn't quite like driving down the freeway for a few kilometers and back, more like flying out of the atmosphere with a trained crew and technical staff to sort things out. It in fact took three years to mount a rescue mission for the ailing telescope, seven crew members and five space walks. The problem was a tiny circular aberration within the mirror that was less than 1/50th the thickness of a piece of paper but when the first clear pictures were received back on Earth the images were breathtaking.
V838 Monocerotis
 The Hubble's elevated location and, as can be imagined, advanced optics afford the telescope the ability to focus on objects extremely far away and acquire high resolution images of outstanding quality. The telescope has of course been serviced a number of times, the last being in 2009. It was expected to continue in service until 2014 with a replacement telescope, the James Webb Telescope, being launched in 2018. Hubble is still functioning and is expected to continue doing just that until at least 2019, a year after the launch of it's successor.
Data, Data, Data, that's Hubble Space Telescope's primary function and it's doing a very fine job.
Me personally, I love God more than anything but to see what He has created in the universe has always been a passion of mine and now I can observe to my hearts content sitting comfortably at my desk thanks to the Hubble Space Telescope.
Bless you Lord for this amazing universe you have given us to explore and admire, it's definitely been worth it so far.

1 comment:

  1. Love this post, Geoff! I have been thrilled and mesmerized by the images I've seen from the Hubble! And, like you, it have led me to a deep reverence and awe of the Creator who made all these wondrous things!
    Revisit the Tender Years with me during the #AtoZChallenge at Life & Faith in Caneyhead!

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